chewtastic
thesoulfunkybrother:

Chicago. 1969. Black Panther leaders

thesoulfunkybrother:

Chicago. 1969. Black Panther leaders

Reminds me of whiticism

Reminds me of whiticism

dutchslavetrade:

I Like Andy Warhol in Black Face (second version), 2013 84cm x 102cm acrylic on wood

dutchslavetrade:

I Like Andy Warhol in Black Face (second version), 2013 84cm x 102cm acrylic on wood

dutchslavetrade:

I Am Running Like A Guineafowl to Make An Effort, 2013  acrylic on 96cm x 64cm 70lb paper

The Helmeted Guineafowl (Numida meleagris) is the best known of the guineafowl bird family, Numididae, and the only member of the genus Numida. It breeds in Africa, mainly south of the Sahara, and has been widely introduced into the West Indies, Brazil, Australia and southern France. Guineafowl have a long history of domestication, mainly involving the Helmeted Guineafowl; in the UK they were usually known as “gleanies”. The young (called “keets”) are very small at birth. The keets are kept in a brooder box inside the house until about six weeks of age, before being moved into a proper coop or enclosure. They eat lice, worms, ants, spiders, weedseeds, and ticks while on range.
In African tradtions, the guineafowl is a bird of protection and is symbolic of human effort at survival.

Yes.

dutchslavetrade:

I Am Running Like A Guineafowl to Make An Effort, 2013  acrylic on 96cm x 64cm 70lb paper

The Helmeted Guineafowl (Numida meleagris) is the best known of the guineafowl bird family, Numididae, and the only member of the genus Numida. It breeds in Africa, mainly south of the Sahara, and has been widely introduced into the West Indies, Brazil, Australia and southern France. Guineafowl have a long history of domestication, mainly involving the Helmeted Guineafowl; in the UK they were usually known as “gleanies”. The young (called “keets”) are very small at birth. The keets are kept in a brooder box inside the house until about six weeks of age, before being moved into a proper coop or enclosure. They eat lice, worms, ants, spiders, weedseeds, and ticks while on range.

In African tradtions, the guineafowl is a bird of protection and is symbolic of human effort at survival.

Yes.

We’ve been on the interwebs what, 10, 12, a million years? The entire time I’ve wanted to be able to turn off the audio feed from the browser. Has nobody bothered to write that tiny-ass script yet? Fuck.

uchicagopress:


Cover Sale 2011

If you missed it in person, get viral with the online version. Over 600 books from across the disciplines, discounted up to 80 percent, in every subject category. Set a reminder for the remainders, baby: we’ve witnessed baby strollers packed from top to bottom, four giant boxes sent via media mail, and some Hyde Park-types schlepping pull carts packed to the gills at the sale in situ, so catch up while you can digitally! The spiel is below:

Open the PDF catalog (it will open in a new window so you can still see these instructions) for hundreds of scholarly and award-winning books at up to 80% off. For much more information about each book—including previews, tables of contents, and author bios—click on the book title in the catalog.

uchicagopress:

jacket image
This week brought The Black Power Mixtape to Chicago, though the film was previously released in early September to audiences in Los Angeles and New York. A documentary pieced together by filmmaker Goran Hugo Olsson from hundreds of reels of 16-mm interview footage produced by Swedish television journalists from 1967 to 1975, The Black Power Mixtape interlaces contemporary audio commentary revisting the Movement with many clips either unseen since they first aired in Europe, or lost to network archives. Organized chronologically by year, the film documents the rise of Black Power, from Stokely Carmichael’s earliest post-SNCC speeches and the founding of the Black Panther Party’s Free Breakfast Program to TV Guide’s (a publication owned by Richard Nixon’s then Ambassador to the United Kingdom, Walter Annenberg) critique of Scandinavian television’s “negative” portrayal of American society, eventually trailing off into more-or-less vernacular pieces on Harlem bookstores and drug-treatment culture.

To watch the movement’s rhetorical development and the increasing exile, imprisonment, and death of its leaders alongside the community’s—and nation’s—growing disillusionment with the Vietnam War, Nixon administration politics, and urban poverty, is a fascinating exercise in the nuances of discrimination and endemic societal problems. To watch all of this alongside a sometimes sympathetic, often curious, and largely culturally distanced assortment of Swedish journalists (drawn from over twenty televised broadcasts) leaves you pondering an almost inexplicable gap—between that time and the present, between these two societies (often united by their anti-Vietnam political stance), and between the roles of participant and observer. What sort of historical reading properly prepares you for a bus of blonde-haired Swedish investigative journalists being chastised about exploring Harlem, as their tour guide uncomfortably stumbles out a comment about how their fear is shared by better (“better?” “Can I say that?”) African American citizens?

In 2001, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies at Princeton University, edited the collection Is It Nation Time? Contemporary Essays on Black Power and Black Nationalism—thirty-five years after Adam Clayton Powell Jr. delivered, as part of his baccalaureate address at Howard University, an early version of the phrase: “To demand these God-given rights is to seek black power.” Is It Nation Time? collects new and classic writings on the Black Power Movement and its legacy by renowned thinkers—including Glaude, Cornel West, and Robin D. G. Kelley—in order to tackle contemporary issues such as the commodification of blackness, class tensions, and the larger discourse surrounding black nationalism.

jacket image

A precursor to Is It Nation Time?, William L. Van Deburg’s New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975, follows the literal arc of much of The Black Power Mixtape’s historical trajectory, offering a comprehensive account of the Black Power Movement’s rise and fall, from its preconditions to ideologies that straddled everything from labor and campus life to sports, soul music, theology, and nationalism. The book garnered the Gustavus Myers Center’s Outstanding Book Award (1993), and was praised by Bob Blauner in the New York Times as a “densely textured evocation of one of American history’s most revolutionary transformations in ethnic group consciousness.”

Angela Davis, who recently retired from the University of California, Santa Cruz’s History of Consciousness program, where she long served as a professor (she’s currently Distinguished Professor in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at Syracuse University), has several key moments in The Black Power Mixtape (including one that demonstrated the journalists’ unusual access to Davis during her 1971-72 stay in a Marin County prison cell). The most pressing of these occurs during the conclusion of one interview, where Davis states (in response to a question about violence in the movement): “When someone asks me about violence, I find it incredible,” she says. “A person asking that can have no idea about what black people have gone through in this country.”

To understand the raw emotion and power of Davis’s articulation, Is It Nation Time? and New Day in Babylon are fine places to start—but to place her words in the context of our own continued struggles for social justice and equality today, where institutional racism, economic disparity, the struggle for GLBTQ rights, and other issues play out in daily headlines, is to hear an echo of her furious intensity as part of a soundtrack whose audience continues to grow.

1black_power_mixtape_angela_davis1.jpg
dutchslavetrade:

Babylone Caramel au Beurre, 2001 23cm x 35cm linocut print  on 75lb paper (ed.11)
This is the fourth in a series of six linocuts.

I has this!

dutchslavetrade:

Babylone Caramel au Beurre, 2001 23cm x 35cm linocut print  on 75lb paper (ed.11)

This is the fourth in a series of six linocuts.

I has this!

animalstalkinginallcaps:

ALL I’M SAYING IS THAT YOU SEEM TO HAVE FAILED TO GRASP THE BASIC PARADOX THAT WITHOUT YOUR COMBINED WHITE AND FEMALE PRIVILEGE YOU WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN GRANTED THE OPPORTUNITY TO ATTEND AN ACCREDITED UNIVERSITY TO MAJOR IN SOCIOECONOMICS AND GENDER STUDIES IN THE FIRST PLACE.
SO BASICALLY YOU PAID TO GO TO SCHOOL TO LEARN TO HATE THE FACT THAT YOU LIVE IN A SOCIETY THAT WILL SEND YOU TO SCHOOL TO LEARN TO HATE IT.
I JUST GOT A LIBRARY CARD AND CALLED IT GOOD.

animalstalkinginallcaps:

ALL I’M SAYING IS THAT YOU SEEM TO HAVE FAILED TO GRASP THE BASIC PARADOX THAT WITHOUT YOUR COMBINED WHITE AND FEMALE PRIVILEGE YOU WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN GRANTED THE OPPORTUNITY TO ATTEND AN ACCREDITED UNIVERSITY TO MAJOR IN SOCIOECONOMICS AND GENDER STUDIES IN THE FIRST PLACE.

SO BASICALLY YOU PAID TO GO TO SCHOOL TO LEARN TO HATE THE FACT THAT YOU LIVE IN A SOCIETY THAT WILL SEND YOU TO SCHOOL TO LEARN TO HATE IT.

I JUST GOT A LIBRARY CARD AND CALLED IT GOOD.

animalstalkinginallcaps:

ALL THIS TIME I THOUGHT IT WAS ‘PEAKED MY INTEREST’ BUT IT’S ‘PIQUED’.
NICE ENGLISH DEGREE YOU’RE HANDING OUT, BOSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE. I’VE GOT A SUPER BRIGHT FUTURE IN YOUTUBE COMMENTS.

animalstalkinginallcaps:

ALL THIS TIME I THOUGHT IT WAS ‘PEAKED MY INTEREST’ BUT IT’S ‘PIQUED’.

NICE ENGLISH DEGREE YOU’RE HANDING OUT, BOSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE. I’VE GOT A SUPER BRIGHT FUTURE IN YOUTUBE COMMENTS.

Dart Bowl

Dart Bowl

dutchslavetrade:

Everyone Is Afraid Of Falling Backwards (small version), 2011 18cm x18cm graphite on 65lb paper

dutchslavetrade:

Everyone Is Afraid Of Falling Backwards (small version), 2011 18cm x18cm graphite on 65lb paper

Taking notes on bowling videos probably isn’t normal, unhermity behavior. After technique? Understanding physics of weighted-core balls. What?